In most of the developed countries, the democratization of personal cars occurred during the fifties when the people and the economy could finally recover from the WWII. Japan was not an exception. First, their automobile fleet was mainly composed of American cars but a nationalist government policy in 1958 gave the priority to Japanese made cars. That’s how Nissan, Toyota, Subaru and Mazda became great car manufacturers. The latter, Mazda, was manufacturing machine tools and took the opportunity to produce passenger cars in 1960 with the Mazda R360.

The Mazda R360 is a Keicar (kei jidōsha in Japanese) and before writing about the car, we should develop this range. After the WWII, cars were not affordable for most people therefore motorbikes were chosen as the popular mean of locomotion. A good compromise was found by the government by encouraging the development of small cars with motorcycles’ engines and therefore a price decrease. In 1955, the engine size limitation was expanded to 360cc and this explains the names Subaru 360, Honda N360, Mazda R360, K360, P360 and B360. DNA Collectibles chose to start its Keicar collection with the Mazda R360 coupe in the 1/18 scale. Start? Yes, because there will be more in the future. The first time I saw it, I thought that it was based on a Japanese cartoon with its small face, big eyes and two-tone body. In 1960, the success was just around the corner and by selling 23000 units the first seven months, Mazda made a breakthrough in the Japanese car market. The brilliant idea was to produce a version with an automatic transmission (besides the manual clutch version), indeed, disabled persons from lower social classes could also enjoy having their own affordable car.

After releasing a scale model microcar from the United Kingdom (The Bond Bug) and from Germany (The Fuldamobil S-6), DNA Collectibles continues its world tour in Japan with its first four-wheeled bubble-car. Another exclusivity, another highly detailed model, another worldwide availability, check it out by yourself here.

In most of the developed countries, the democratization of personal cars occurred during the fifties when the people and the economy could finally recover from the WWII. Japan was not an exception. First, their automobile fleet was mainly composed of American cars but a nationalist government policy in 1958 gave the priority to Japanese made cars. That’s how Nissan, Toyota, Subaru and Mazda became great car manufacturers. The latter, Mazda, was manufacturing machine tools and took the opportunity to produce passenger cars in 1960 with the Mazda R360.

The Mazda R360 is a Keicar (kei jidōsha in Japanese) and before writing about the car, we should develop this range. After the WWII, cars were not affordable for most people therefore motorbikes were chosen as the popular mean of locomotion. A good compromise was found by the government by encouraging the development of small cars with motorcycles’ engines and therefore a price decrease. In 1955, the engine size limitation was expanded to 360cc and this explains the names Subaru 360, Honda N360, Mazda R360, K360, P360 and B360. DNA Collectibles chose to start its Keicar collection with the Mazda R360 coupe in the 1/18 scale. Start? Yes, because there will be more in the future. The first time I saw it, I thought that it was based on a Japanese cartoon with its small face, big eyes and two-tone body. In 1960, the success was just around the corner and by selling 23000 units the first seven months, Mazda made a breakthrough in the Japanese car market. The brilliant idea was to produce a version with an automatic transmission (besides the manual clutch version), indeed, disabled persons from lower social classes could also enjoy having their own affordable car.

After releasing a scale model microcar from the United Kingdom (The Bond Bug) and from Germany (The Fuldamobil S-6), DNA Collectibles continues its world tour in Japan with its first four-wheeled bubble-car. Another exclusivity, another highly detailed model, another worldwide availability, check it out by yourself here.

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